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Great Snow "Catastrophe" of 2006 - See Pix! PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Saturday, 18 March 2006 11:33

Many residents were surprised by 3-4 feet of snow which made their homes inaccessible for several days in March 2006.
Many were cut off from the rest of the world. Phone lines and electricity were down, cars were "snowed in" with no way to free them. Some were hit harder as....

Great Snow "Catastrophe" of 2006

Many residents were surprised by 3-4 feet of snow which made their homes inaccessible for several days in March 2006. Many were cut off from the rest of the world. Phone lines and electricity were down, cars were "snowed in" with no way to free them. Some were hit harder as they couldn't go on their daily commutes to work. One neighbor had to have his follow-up surgery delayed. Some had no heat has their heating systems depend on electricity (like electric heaters, pellet stoves) or because they couldn't access their fire wood supplies. A few had to park their cars miles from home and brave the snow storm on foot, at night on an icy road. When they returned to their vehicles they found them buried behind or under huge snow berms created by giant snow-removal machines.

The following snapshots were taken from the bottom of one driveway right off Crestline (the main road). The mess you see was not sought out. All pictures were taken from one spot - by merely zooming the camera in different directions.

driveway off Crestline Rd.

Above picture shows a driveway off Crestline.

Snow Laden Tree

Above: Heavy build-up of snow and ice in the tree crowns makes the trees top-heavy. Many branches and indeed entire trees were pulled to the ground and snapped under the heavy weight. Electric- and phone lines were clipped and many roads and easements were blocked by fallen trees.

Kathy's Easement

Above:  Here you can see an easement (dirt road) obstructed by a fallen tree. Residents are in for some major chainsaw work before they can get in/out of there. Trees and branches could be heard crashing to the ground throughout the night and following day.

Snow Plows on Crestline

Here you see a convoy of snow plows compacting all snow to the side, regardless of driveways, roads, easements or parked cars. During the day the snow is soft but it freezes solid during the cold night making it very hard to penetrate with mere shovels. The berm in this driveway was 5 ft tall!
See the following illustrations and a small article we found on the web about snow plows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here it comes again – snow – and snow plows.  Please remember that snow berms are like taxes – they come every year whether we like it or not.  They are just part of life in snow country.  To help minimize the frustration, it is best to acknowledge that snow berms are the normal consequences of snow plowing operations. They are not caused by poor equipment or mean operators.  They are caused by the laws of physics. Snow unloads from a plow blade wherever there is a void.  If a void is not created by shoveling an opening into the driveway, the plow blade will not unload at that location. We recommend that you not shovel the last few feet of the driveway or easement until all the plowing for the day is done.  This will cause less snow to be pushed into your driveway.  If you have to open a void so you can get to work, school or just out-and-about before the plows have passed, please recognize that a berm is inevitable.Please do not shovel or push snow back into the road after the plows have passed.  This practice just creates ice hazards for your neighbors and the plow equipment.

Last Updated on Saturday, 24 April 2010 08:11